RN RAF Harrier Aircraft Rolls Royce Pegasus Jet Engine Titanium Fan LP1

£4,999.99

1 in stock

Description

British Aerospace Harrier GR9 Jump Jet Aircraft

Rolls Royce Pegasus MK 105 Jet Engine LP1 Front Fan

With log card and aircraft history having previously been fitted to the following aircraft:

  • ZG504,(operated by 4 Sqn)
  • ZG477, (retired as the 1 Sqn special tail Harrier now on display at the RAF Museum Hendon)
  • ZG505 (Combat Veteran aircraft having seen service in Afghanistan based at Kandahar)

LP1 Compressor Fan, The most sought after part of the engine.

 Ideal for creating unusual Aviation wall Art in the Office – display it in your reception, or create one-off office desk.  

Cost over £120,000 new

Made from Titanium

Size: 117cm diameter x 20cm depth Approx. Weight 80kg approx

Part Number: B518845

S/N: 01362C

F731 paperwork shows the fan was placed Un-serviceable in 2009 at RAF Wittering as ”Module Not Balanced, to be used as Training aid Only”

Attached is also a Component Record card Form 735A showing that the fan was fitted to the following aircraft in service: ZG504 in 2003, ZG477 in 2003 and ZG505 in 2005. This fan was fitted to the following Rolls Royce Pegasus engine serial numbers during its service life: 11138, 11135, 11068, 11136,

Condition: Very good used as flown condition with HISTORY

SHIPPING:

  • All quotes are estimates
  • Please contact us for a more accurate shipping cost to your address
  • Shipping prices are based on the fan bubble wrapped on a pallet. We can quote for a bespoke crate for your item, this is at the buyers expense

 

Background

The Harrier, informally referred to as the Harrier Jump Jet, is a family of jet fighters capable of vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) operations. Originally developed by UK manufacturer Hawker Siddeley in the 1960s, the Harrier emerged as the only truly successful V/STOL design of the many attempted during that era, despite being a subsonic aircraft, unlike most of its competitors. It was conceived to operate from improvised bases, such as car parks or forest clearings, without requiring large and vulnerable air bases. Later, the design was adapted for use from aircraft carriers. 

Last photo to illustrate Harrier Aircraft in service and is courtesy of Bob Walker. 

 

Our ref: 20072030

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